Gay Sex BDSM Limitations – Masochism and Sadomasochism

If you’re a submissive guy, you probably have some limits — things you’ll never allow your Dom to do. But there are also “soft limits,” which can be negotiated.

Disclosing and abiding by these limits is compatible with most BDSM safely philosophies. In fact, it’s a core part of them.

Controlling or Dominating

For many straight people, the idea of a cis guy controlling a bottom or using whips and chains to elicit kink-y pleasure is unthinkable. But it doesn’t have to be. BDSM and bondage are non-normative sexual practices, and the community has contributed to LGBTQ acceptance by showing that gay men can be dominant and submissive.

In addition to the dominance and submission components of BDSM, some practitioners explore sadism or masochism. Sadomasochism is an intense sexual experience that involves pain and pleasure. It is not a requirement of BDSM, but it can enhance the experience and provide new kinks for participants. It is important to talk about and agree on limits with the person you are playing with — whether it be hard or soft.

For example, if you are going to play with a partner who enjoys disciplining you, make sure both of you discuss the boundaries you want to set. You can also use safewords to communicate during a session, such as “green” for go ahead, yellow for slow down or stop, and red to say you are finished. This will help ensure your safety and a good experience. This is one of the most important things you can do to create a healthy BDSM relationship. Goddexx Haru recommends talking with your partners about what turns each of you on and off, as well as exploring any kinks that are outside of each other’s comfort zone.

Sadomasochism or Masochism

For some people involved in BDSM, the enjoyment of pain and humiliation goes beyond sexual pleasure. These kink activities are often known as sadomasochism or mastochism and can involve pain in many forms, including touch, impact play, beatings and even breath play. While a person’s participation in masochism or sadomasochism is not usually viewed as a mental health disorder, it can lead to emotional distress and even psychological damage.

The current version of the American Psychiatric Association’s diagnostic manual, DSM-5, excludes consensual BDSM from being diagnosed as a disorder when it does not cause any harm or distress to participants. Nonetheless, some research has been done on the subject to explore what drives some people to engage in sadomasochistic activities. Some researchers have found that this is often a form of self-mutilation. It is also thought that a person’s desire to participate in sadomasochistic activities can sometimes be an indication of unresolved or conflicted emotions from the past, such as feelings of powerlessness, shame or guilt.

While many people enjoy BDSM, it is important to recognize that it is not for everyone. In addition, it is important to understand that if you see someone tying up another person or being physically abused, this is not BDSM and could be abusive. For most, BDSM is simply an enjoyable way to experience power and control, like many other kink activities.

Consent

Many BDSM practices involve pain or humiliation, so it’s important that you communicate with your partner(s) about your limits and boundaries. “Safe words” are an easy way to communicate with your partner and ensure that all sexual experiences are consensual. You and your partner(s) should also agree in advance on the role each of you will play, whether it’s dominance and submission or masochism and sadomasochism.

In recent years, BDSM has become more popular among the LGBTQ community. This is great because it has helped to make non-heterosexual sex less of a taboo. Moreover, the popularity of BDSM has encouraged people to explore their own sexual desires. Even the most mainstream businessmen are wearing tights, becoming drag queens or undergoing gender-changing surgeries.

Even so, there is still a significant portion of the public that views homosexuality and BDSM as deviance, so it’s crucial to educate yourself and share your own beliefs with friends and family. Moreover, there are gay bars and queer events that host kink parties, where you can meet other gay men who are into leather and power play. And of course, there are also online gay kink communities that allow you to find your perfect match for any kinky scene you can imagine. Ultimately, BDSM has helped to ease the process of accepting LGBTQ people, but there’s still more work to be done.